BREAM : The Bream is a deep bodied fish that has a thick covering of slime to protect it. Young Bream are more silvery than the adults which are usually darker with a greenish tinge. Bream are usually found in large shoals, preferring deep, slow rivers or still waters.

They usually feed on or near the bottom, feeding on worm, maggot, caster or sweetcorn. A large shoal of Bream require large quantities of ground bait to keep them in your swim, otherwise they soon move on looking for other feeding areas. Bream is not generally a hard fighting fish, they usually come to the net with little resistance.
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BARBEL : The Barbel is a bottom dwelling fish, preferring clean rivers with stretches of gravel, pools and deeper areas.
The fish is named because it has two pairs of barbels(feelers) located around their mouth. Barbel are torpedo shaped and of a golden bronze colour,with large reddish brown fins. Barbel are a hard fighting fish that will test both the Angler and their tackle to the limit. Good baits include luncheon meat, sweetcorn and maggots.
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CARP : ( Common, Leather, Mirror) The Carp family were originally introduced to the UK by the Romans. They have been selectively bred over the years, resulting in the species we have today.
The Commom Carp is fully scaled and the Mirror Carp is partially scaled and the Leather Carp has very few scales running along it's back. Carp are found in lakes, slow flowing rivers and increasingly, some canals. Whilst they are generally bottom feeders, they can also be caught on the surface using floating bait, such as breadcrust and dog biscuit. When fishing on the surface always be aware of Ducks as they may take your bait. Other good baits include maggots, luncheon meat and sweetcorn. Carp are hard fighting fish so a strong tackle is required.

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Bream
Barbel
Common Carp

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